Drug testing

Are Your Cells Talking To Each Other?

Are Your Cells Talking To Each Other?

Communication! It permeates our lives. We communicate for many reasons such as: 1) to get what we want, 2) to get rid of what we don't want, 3) to let people know how we feel, 4) to show people we care, 5) to work productively with co-workers, etc. As members of the human race we are fortunate to have various ways to communicate our needs and desires. We can talk, use body language, write our requests or key them into the computer.

But what would happen if we spoke one language and the intended receiver of our message spoke another language. Or perhaps we are speaking on the phone to a friend and static interfers so much that they only hear some of our words or we say one word and they hear it as a different word. Perhaps we are sending our message via computer but some of the keys are either missing or mixed up. That could cause some confusion, right? And the more static or more keys that are missing, the more confused the message is. On the other hand the better we can communicate with other people, the higher level we can function at.

Did you know that the same thing happens in our body? Our body is designed to function at an amazing level. When we think of how complicated our body is, of all the things that could go wrong, and of how much actually goes right without our even thinking about it, it is truly amazing. But why do things sometimes go wrong?

Our body is made up of various systems (circulatory, nervous, muscular, etc) that are made up of organs (heart, lungs, blood vessels) that are made up of cells. To understand the importance of communication in our body, let's take a look at what would happen if our body was a business.

If our body was a company, our systems would be the various departments in the company, our organs would be the teams of people working together within each department, and the cells would be each individual person within the teams. The individual people are the powerhouses of the company. If they are doing what they are supposed to do, when and how they are supposed to, and if they are communicating well to each other to get their individual needs met, then the team will work well. If the teams are working well and communicating so their needs are met, the department will work well. And if all departments are communicating and getting their needs met, the company is successful. But if communication brakes down at any level, it puts the success of the company in jeopardy.

Just as people power companies, our cells power our bodies. So what do our cells need and how do they communicate to each other? Let's look at their needs first. In order to work optimally our cells require nutrients which they use to produce energy and repair themselves. This process produces waste materials which they must eliminate. And they must identify themselves as to what kind of cells they are and if they are native to our body or if they are an intruder (virus, bad bacteria, etc). Each cell is covered with glycoproteins (much like a fuzzy ball). When our cells touch each other these glycoproteins pass messages from one cell to another. The glycoproteins are comprised of variations of 4 proteins and 8 essential sugars (also called carbohydrates or saccharides).

If all glycoproteins are completely formed (no missing sugars or proteins), the message gets passed along intact and the needs of the cell are satisfied. However, just like having static on the phone lines or missing keys on the computer keyboard; if something is missing from the glycoproteins, communication breaks down and the cell either doesn't get what it needs or is sabotaged by sending out a wrong message.

What happens if a cell doesn't get the nutrients it needs to produce energy or repair itself?
Oooh! Energy drain! Premature aging!

What happens if it's message to get rid of waste material is not understood?
Ouch! Toxin build-up! Yuck!

What if it is an invading virus but the body doesn't know it because of faulty cell communication?
Cold? Flu? Pneumonia? _____?

What if it is in fact a native cell that gives out a message that is interpreted by another cell that it is an invader?
Oh-oh! The macrophages are called in to eat it up pac-man style. If this happens frequently enough, we will eventually be diagnosed with one of the 85 known auto-immune diseases.

Wow! Did you have any idea how important each of your cells is (yes, all trillions of them). So how do we keep our cells communicating? It is in the glycoproteins. If our glycoproteins are complete and properly formed, our cells are happily sending and receiving the right messages. Highly functioning cells make highly functioning organs, which make highly functioning systems, which make a highly functioning body for us. The bottom line is getting the right nutrition so our cells can make complete and properly formed glycoproteins.

? Jan Barosh 2004. Permission is granted to reprint this article in print or on your web site so long as the following paragraph is included and contact information is provided to http://www.janbarosh.com

Jan Barosh's degree is in health and physical education with post- graduate work in exercise science and psychology. She is a licensed corporate wellness coach and a certified teleclass leader and has helped adults and children be more healthy and fit for over 25 years. Jan has developed a unique weight management program called LifeWeight? which is being taught in the US and licensed for distribution in the UK.

In The News:

A tiny chunk of stone that looks like nothing else ever seen in the solar system might be even weirder than scientists thought.
Scientists across the globe are carefully monitoring China’s discarded Tiangong-1 space station, which will plunge into Earth’s atmosphere at some point in the coming months.
The fossilized remains of a tiny duck-sized dinosaur with rainbow feathers have been discovered.
LEGAZPI, Philippines (AP) — Nearly 15,000 people have fled from villages around the Philippines' most active volcano as lava flowed down its crater Monday in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive.
New image analysis by researchers at SETI indicate that there may be subterranean lava tubes in the polar region of the moon leading to massive underground glaciers, which could provide fuel for a long-term lunar base.
A SpaceX Dragon cargo ship left the International Space Station and returned to Earth Saturday (Jan.
Paleontoligists have discovered a new species of dinosaur in south-eastern Australia that was the size of a turkey.
While John Young, who died on Jan. 5 at age 87 , is famous for his Apollo 16 moonwalks and his role as commander of the first space shuttle mission, the NASA astronaut is also remembered for a small scandal he triggered with a sneaky act: smuggling a corned-beef sandwich into space.
Once upon a time, 165 million years ago, there lived a spider who looked like a pelican. About the size of a grain of rice and just as quiet, the pelican spider tiptoed under foliage in the leafy parts of the world, looking for prey to impale with the fanged, beak-like pincers at the end of its long neck. Its favorite meal: other spiders.
Sizable deposits of water ice lurk just beneath the surface in some regions of Mars, a new study reports.

Can Chronic Pain Come From Food Additives?

It is always amazing to me when I find a... Read More

The Secrets of the Centenarians: How to Live to 100!

When Helen Boardman was still a girlish 99, she fell... Read More

Healthy Eating Habits

I read a lot about the topics of health and... Read More

Understanding Glyconutrients

You say you don't know what glyconutrients are? You are... Read More

Unhealthy Foods: Five Sneaky Foods Revealed

With the array of different diets and diet foods available... Read More

The Anti-Aging Wonders of Hyaluronic Acid

ABC News has recently focused on the possible anti-aging benefits... Read More

Nutrition N Diet

Nutrition facts have become a part of everyday life because... Read More

Is Chocolate A New Health Food?

Could it be possible that our beloved chocolate may actually... Read More

How to Help Your Picky Eater

One of the most common questions I am asked is... Read More

Turn to Diet for Everyday Ailments

The old clich? that you are what you eat is... Read More

Building Better Bones

"It is a bone-deep change you are going into, my... Read More

Do You Know What You Are Eating?

With all the news about Splenda of late and the... Read More

Protective Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 appear to reduce the risk of heart attack. A... Read More

Eliminate Sugar and Lose Weight

If you want to lose weight, there is one thing... Read More

Discover How to Grow Your Own Source of Vitamins, Fiber, Proteins, and More

Sprouts not only taste good, but they are also a... Read More

Olive Oil, the Healthy Choice

Olive oil is a healthy choice over other fats such... Read More

Brown Sugar is Not Brown Rice

Question from Jack:A question from Jack, one of the subscribers... Read More

Time Line of the Development of GlycoBiology and GlycoNutritionals

1880s - Characterization of monosaccharides by Emil Fischer.1952 - Fresh,... Read More

Unhealthy Foods: How To Become Disgusted By Junk Foods That Make You Fat

With today's time constraints, stressful jobs, and "thin is in"... Read More

The Cholesterol Myth

Cholesterol. What images come to mind when you see this... Read More

Food Additives Affect Behavior

On average 30% of foods in our daily diet are... Read More

Good Eggs -- Rediscover The Simple Pleasures of Eggs!

Health food or heart attack on a plate? Eggs had... Read More

Missing Link to the Immune System

For decades science has been looking for the answers to... Read More

Food Intolerance

Many people experience unpleasant reactions to foods they have eaten... Read More

The Five Keys to Healthy Eating

1. Enjoy what you eatWhether someone is following the Atkins... Read More

street light camera induction wallpack Pete's produce ..